5 Egg-Centric Science Experiments for Kids

Easter is right around the corner, which likely means that you’ve got a fridge full of eggs that you’re not sure you’ll be able to work your way through. Why not use them to teach your kids about science in a fun, easily-accessible, and totally seasonal way? Your kids will learn basic science while being able to play with their food. Win-win.

Cube that Egg. Eggs are ovals, right? Well, not necessarily. Eggs are largely made up of water and protein. When the protein is heated up, the egg white takes on a gel-like consistency, allowing it be molded into different shapes. Find out how to do it, and read more about the science behind it, here.

Make your own geode. You don’t need to head to OMSI to buy a geode. You can make your own at home! Learn about how real-life geodes are formed, and learn a bit more about supersaturated solutions with this experiment.

Do the impossible. An egg is bigger than the mouth of a bottle – so how could it possible go in? Your kids will learn about air pressure while not believing their eyes as your reenact this classic science experiment together.

Make Your Egg Bounce. Vinegar is excellent to have on hand for more than just cleaning. Vinegar can also do some truly crazy things to an egg. It can turn an egg transparent. And it can even make one bounce! Find out how and why here.

Make a Volcano with Your Leftover Easter Egg Dying Supplies. Science doesn’t have to be dull. It can be technicolor and full of sparkles, too! If you dye your Easter eggs in vinegar, don’t throw away that colored liquid. Instead, learn what happens when a base interacts with an acid. Throw in some glitter for an even bigger wow. Make sure you do the experiment in a pan, or outside, to contain the mess!

Did you do one? Let us know in the comments, or send a picture to us on Facebook!

Ali Wilkinson
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Ali Wilkinson

Online Editor at PDX Parent
Ali Wilkinson is the Online Editor for PDX Parent, and is one of the founders of PDX Kids Calendar. She loves exploring Portland with her three small children, especially when the explorations lead outdoors, to music or to ice cream. You can read more from Ali at www.runknitlove.com.
Ali Wilkinson
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