Sachet Cachet

The educators at Zenger Farm share their recipe for homemade herbal sachets for the kitchen and the bath.

Metro Parent January 2015. Hands On: Zenger Farms Sachet Cachet.Winter is a great time for crafting with perennial herbs. At the farm, we like to make herb sachets that can be used as herbal tea, flavoring for broth or sauces, or soothing scents for the bath.

Take a walk in the garden and harvest whole leaves of fresh herbs such as rosemary, sage, winter savory and thyme to enhance the flavors for a broth. Or visit your grocery store’s bulk spice section for dried herbs and spices.

Combine your favorite herbs and spices from the following categories, then follow the directions to make them into a sachet. The sachets are easy enough for kids to make and give as gifts.

Herbs for the Kitchen

Mint adds a refreshing taste to any dish or drink while also calming the stomach.

Rosemary enhances the flavors in poultry and fish, and also lifts the spirits.

Sage pairs well with poultry, and also helps fight infection.

Thyme mixes well with dairy, vegetables and meats, and eases breathing.

Herbs for the Bath

Lavender calms the body and mind. Hang in a closet to keep clothes smelling fresh.

Rosemary stimulates circulation and the scent infuses the mind with memories.

Add oats to a bath sachet to soften and moisturize your skin.

Chai Tea Blend

Cloves and peppercorns add a spicy heat to this tea.

Cinnamon sticks and cardamom add a warm aromatic touch.

Dried orange peel gives a fresh burst of flavor.

Materials Needed:

  • Cheesecloth
  • Fresh herbs or dried herb leaves, or dried citrus peel and whole spices
  • Cooking twine

Putting Them Together:

  1. Cut a square of cheesecloth and place your herb/spice blend in the middle of the square cloth. Bring the four corners of the cloth together and tie with cooking twine, making sure that there are no gaps where herbs could escape.
  2. If you are using fresh herbs in your sachet, use the sachet within a few days. If you are using dried herbs, your sachet will last for months!
  3. Write down the ingredients on a small piece of paper, make a hole in it, and tie the label to the end of your cooking twine so you can give the sachet as a gift, or remember the flavor for later. If you use your culinary sachet in a cooking pot, use a piece of cooking twine long enough to secure the cheesecloth and tie to the handle of the pot so the herbs can float as they cook and you can easily remove them before serving.

Zenger_FarmAbout Zenger Farm
Founded in 1999, Zenger Farm is a working urban farm that models, promotes and educates about sustainable food systems, environmental stewardship, community development and access to good food for all. It consists of 16 acres of farm and wetland in outer southeast Portland, and will open the doors of a new 6,600 square foot classroom facility and community kitchen this spring.

They also offer spring break, winter break and summer camps for kids. Visit them at zengerfarm.org.

Allison O'Sullivan
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Allison O'Sullivan

Allison O’Sullivan is the youth education manager at Zenger Farm, a working urban farm in outer Southeast Portland that models, promotes and educates about sustainable food systems, environmental stewardship, community development and access to good food for all. They also offer spring break, winter break and summer camps for kids.
Allison O'Sullivan
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