Nut-butter Balls

Go Nuts

These healthy nut-butter balls are a great protein-filled snack.

New Seasons nutritionist Christi Reed is a big fan of healthy fats for kids. Here, she offers an energy-boosting, tastes-great treat to help ward off that 5 p.m. meltdown. This recipe is perfect for those kids who might have beanut allergies, but can eat other nuts and seeds. It’s also a great gluten- and dairy-free choice to take to a holiday cookie exchange.

But take note, if you’ve got a child under age 1, sub in the maple syrup for the honey, to ward off the threat of botulism. You can also use stewed prunes, mashed bananas or dried apricots in place of maple syrup or honey.

Bonus: This one is easy for your kids to help you make. Let them pour in the coconut and (with clean hands!) roll out the batter into balls. Make a toppings bar with the coatings, and let them go to town.

Nut-butter Balls

½ cup sunflower seed butter or almond butter
½ cup hazelnut butter or cashew butter
¼ cup raw local honey or pure maple syrup
¼ cup unsweetened shredded coconut

Optional add-ins or coatings:

  • Additional unsweetened shredded coconut
  • Shelled hemp seeds
  • Cacao nibs
  • Raw oats

Combine butters, honey, coconut and any additional add-ins in a large bowl. Mix well and refrigerate for 2 to 3 hours. After refrigerating, scoop out a heaping tablespoon or so and the roll nut-butter batter into balls with clean hands. Roll balls in optional coatings or leave uncoated. These will keep in the fridge for three days or so, if they don’t all get eaten right away.

New Seasons nutritionist Christi Reed is a big fan of healthy fats for kids. Here, she offers an energy-boosting, tastes-great treat to help ward off that 5 p.m. meltdown. This recipe is perfect for those kids who might have peanut allergies, but can eat other nuts and seeds. It’s also a great gluten- and dairy-free choice to take to a holiday cookie exchange.

But take note, if you’ve got a child under the age of 1, sub in the maple syrup for the honey, to ward off the threat of botulism. You can also use stewed prunes, mashed bananas or dried apricots in place of maple syrup or honey.

Bonus: This one is easy for your kids to help you make. Let them pour in the coconut and (with clean hands!) roll out the batter into balls. Make a toppings bar with the coatings, and let them go to town.

PDX Parent Staff
PDX Parent Staff

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